There are 13 questions on the state ballot this year. Precinct Committee Person Dora Lodwick has compiled this summary to help with your pre-election research. A downloadable pdf version is available at this link.

Information is from ballotpedia.org, the 2018 State Ballot Information Booklet, the Ballot Issues 2018 of the League of Women Voters, and from IndivisibleNOCO. Further details are in those sources. The voting recommendations are from the League of Women Voters and from IndivisibleNOCO.

Ballot measure & description

Comments

Colorado Amendment V, Reduced Age Qualification for General Assembly Members Amendment LWV and INOCO = YES
Colorado Amendment W, Judge Retention Ballot Language Amendment LWV and INOCO = YES
Colorado Amendment X, Definition of Industrial Hemp Amendment

Supports removing the definition of industrial hemp from the Colorado Constitution and having the definition in state statute.

Comment: By removing the definition of industrial hemp from the Colorado Constitution, it creates more flexibility for the state legislature to the consistent with Federal government’s changes in definition.

INOCO = YES

Colorado Amendment Y, Independent Commission for Congressional Redistricting Amendment

A constitutional amendment to create a 12-member commission to draw Colorado’s congressional districts. It establishes qualifying criteria for members, rules about transparency and ethics, and requirements for the district maps.

Comment: Currently the Colorado General Assembly is responsible for Congressional redistricting under the Governor’s signature. Under this amendment, the Colorado Supreme Court would approve the district maps. In 37 states, the state legislature does the redistricting and 4 states have independent commissions.

Pro: Limits role of partisan politics.

Con: The commissioners are not accountable to the voters.

LWV = YES

Colorado Amendment Z, Independent Commission for State Legislative Redistricting Amendment

A constitutional amendment to create a 12-member commission to draw Colorado’s state House of Representative and Senate districts. It establishes qualifying criteria for members, rules about transparency and ethics, and requirements for the district maps.

Comment: Same as for Amendment Y.

LWV = YES

Colorado Amendment A, Removal of Exception to Slavery Prohibition for Criminals Amendment LWV and INOCO = YES
Colorado Amendment 73, Establish Income Tax Brackets and Raise Taxes for Education Initiative

This supports a constitutional and a statute amendment to establish a tax bracket system rather than a flat tax rate and raise taxes for those earning more than $150,000 per year, raise the corporate income tax rate, and create the Quality Public Education Fund.

Comment: Pro: Dependable way of increasing support for education outside TABOR limitations.

Con: The state will not have flexibility to adjust income tax thresholds.

LWV and INOCO = YES

Amendment 74, Colorado Compensation to Owners for Decreased Property Value Due to State Regulation

This supports a constitutional amendment to require that property owners be compensated for any reduction in property value caused by state laws or regulations.

Comment: Currently the standard of compensation is almost total loss in value or use. The oil and gas industry is the primary financial supporter of this amendment.

Pro: All citizens can make claims for compensation.

Con: Many lawsuits over decrease in fair market value will paralyze government institutions from doing their job and would be expensive for taxpayers.

LWV and INOCO = NO

Amendment 75, Colorado Campaign Finance Amendment

This supports a constitutional amendment that allows all candidates to collect five times the level allowed for individual contribution if another candidate for the same state office loans or contributes at least one million dollars to his or her own campaign.

Comment: In 2002 voters approved limits in amount and types of political contributions. In 2018, Colorado has the next to lowest individual contribution limits – Alaska is the lowest.

Pro: this creates a more level playing field for the less wealthy candidates.

Con: This further inflates elections costs.

LWV = NO

Proposition 109, Colorado Bond Issue for Transportation Initiative

This supports authorizing $3.5 billion in bonds to fund statewide 66 transportation projects including bridge expansion, construction, maintenance, and repairs. It requires that the state repay the debt from the general fund without raising taxes. The funds cannot be used for other transportations issues such as mass transit, administration, bicycles, etc.

Comment: A transportation bond was passed in 1999 and paid back in 2016.

Pro: Will fund 66 planned projects.

Con: Could negatively affect the state budget for education and social services when repaying back bonds, especially should the economy downturn.

LWV and INOCO= NO

Proposition 110, Colorado Bond Issue and Sales Tax Increase for Transportation Initiative

This supports a Colorado statute amendment to authorize $6 billion in bonds to fund transportation projects, establish the Transportation Revenue Anticipation Notes Citizen Oversight Committee, and raise the state sales tax rate by 0.62 percent from 2.9 percent (2018) to 3.52 percent for 20 years starting on January 1, 2019, through January 1, 2039. The sales tax is to be used for repayment of the bonds.

Comment:

Pro: Sustainable source of funding for state and local transportation needs. Gives local control over 55% of the funds.

Con: Sales tax is not a good source of income for transportation and multimodal needs.

LWV and INOCO = YES

Proposition 111, Colorado Limits on Payday Loan Charges Initiative

This supports an initiative to restrict the charges on payday loans to a yearly rate of 36 percent and eliminate all other finance charges and fees associated with payday lending.

Comment: In Colorado, the average payday loan rate in 2016 was 129%. Currently Colorado is one of 3 states limiting rate caps; 32 states have no caps and 11 states prohibit Payday Lending.

Pro: Consumers can repay loans more easily.

Con: This may eliminate Payday Loans in Colorado.

LWV and INOCO = YES

Proposition 112, Colorado Minimum Distance from Occupied Buildings Requirement for New Oil and Gas Projects

This supports an initiative to mandate that new oil and gas development projects not on federal land, be a minimum distance of 2,500 feet from occupied buildings and other areas designated as vulnerable.

Comment: Currently Colorado requires that oil, natural gas and production facilities be at least 1000 ft. from high occupancy buildings like schools and hospitals, 500 ft. from occupied buildings like homes, and 350 ft. from outdoor areas like playgrounds. There has been a 48% increase in producing wells since 2007 to 54,000 in 2017. Oil and gas companies have invested millions of dollars to fight this Proposition.

Pro: Updates distances, consistent with peer reviewed research, to reduce negative health impact.

Con: 85% of Colorado’s non-federal land could not have oil, natural gas and production facilities thus affecting the economy. Only 23% of the job losses would be from the oil and gas sector and 77% from support such as construction, real estate, local government, etc.

LWV and INOCO = YES